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The ships that brought Coone to Ellis Island and the United States of America.

The Amsterdam

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Departures: Rotterdam and Boulogne

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1879. 3,664 gross tons; 410 (bp) feet long; 39 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 13 knots.  732 passengers (94 first class, 638 third class).

Built for British Shipowners Limited, British flag, in 1879 and named British Crown. Sold to Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1887 and renamed Amsterdam . Rotterdam - New York service. Sold to Italian owners and renamed AMSTERDA, but soon scrapped in 1905.

 

The Arabic

The Arabic

Departures:  Queenstown

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1903. 15,801 gross tons; 616 (bp) feet long; 65 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  

Built for Atlantic Transport Line, British flag, in 1903 and intended to be the Minnewaska. Never completed as such. Sold to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1904 and named Arabic. Liverpool-Boston or New York service. Sunk by a German U-boat off southern Ireland in 1915.

 

The Royal George

The Royal George

Departures: Southampton

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company, Glasgow , Scotland , 1907. 11,146 gross tons; 545 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, triple screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,114 passengers (344 first class, 210 second class, 560 third class).

Built for Egyptian Mail Steamship Company, British flag, in 1907 and named Heliopolis . Marseilles-Alexandria service. Laid up 1909. Sold to Canadian Northern Steamship Company, Canadian flag, in 1910 and renamed Royal George. Avonmouth-Montreal service. Sold to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1916. Canadian service and trooping. Liverpool - New York (1919-20) service. Made into an immigrant depot ship at Cherbourg in 1920, but soon laid up. Scrapped in Germany in 1923.

 

The Kroonland

The Kroonland

Departures: Antwerp

Built by William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilders, Philadelphia , Pennsylvania , 1902. 12,760 gross tons; 600 (bp) feet long; 60 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  1,537 passengers (343 first class, 194 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Red Star Line, British flag, in 1902 and named Kroonland. Antwerp - New York service. Under Belgian flag 1908-11. Transferred to American Line, in 1916. 1918-19 US Army transport service. Transferred to Red Star Line, American flag, in 1920. New York-Antwerp service. New York-Hamburg service for American Line in 1923. Sold to Panama Pacific Line, US flag, in 1923. New York-Panama Canal-San Francisco service. New York-Miami service 1925. Laid up in 1926; scrapped in Italy in 1927.  <More Info>

 

The Oceanic

The Oceanic

Departures: Queenstown

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1899. 17,272 gross tons; 704 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 19 knots.  1,710 passengers (410 first class, 300 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1899 and named Oceanic. Liverpool - New York service. World’s largest liner 1899-1901. Converted to wartime Aux. Cruiser. Stranded in the Shetland 9/1914. Gradually scrapped on the spot in 1924.

 

The Teutonic

The Teutonic

Departures: Queenstown

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1889. 9,686 gross tons; 582 (bp) feet long; 57 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 20 knots.  1,490 passengers (300 first class, 190 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1889 and named Teutonic. Liverpool - New York service. Captured the Blue Ribbon in 1891. Scrapped in Germany in 1921.

 

The Cedric

The Cedric

Departures: Queenstown

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1902. 21,035 gross tons; 700 (bp) feet long; 75 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw. Service speed 16 knots. 2,875 passengers (365 first class, 160 second class, 2,350 third class). Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1902 and named Cedric. Liverpool-New York service. Used as an auxiliary cruiser and then as a troopship during World War I. Scrapped in 1932.

 

The Majestic

The Majestic

Departures: Queenstown

 

Built by Blohm & Voss Shipbuilders, Hamburg, Germany , 1922. 56,551 gross tons; 950 (bp) feet long; 100 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, triple screw.  Service speed 23.5 knots.  2,145 passengers (750 first class, 545 second class, 850 third class).

Built for Hamburg-American Line, German flag, in 1914 and named Bismarck . Laid up, 1914-19. Work contiuned in Britain until 1919. Sold to White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1921 and renamed Majestic. Southampton - New York service. Transferred to Cunard Line, British flag, in 1934. World’s largest liner until 1935. Laid-up in 1936. Sold for scrap. Sold to British Admiralty, British flag, in 1936 and renamed HMS Caledonia. Refitted as cadets’ training ship service. Burned and sank while berthed at Rosyth , Scotland on September 29, 1939 . Scrapped in 1943.

 

The Lusitania

The Lusitania

Departures: Queenstown

Built by John Brown & Company, Clydebank , Scotland , 1907. 31,550 gross tons; 787 (bp) feet long; 87 feet wide. Steam turbine engines, quadruple screw.  Service speed 25 knots.  2,165 passengers (563 first class, 464 second class, 1,138 third class).

Built for Cunard Line, British flag, in 1907 and named Lusitania . Liverpool - New York service. Torpedoed and sunk off the Irish coast; 1,198 lost in 1915.

 

The Britannic

The Britannic

Departures: Liverpool & Queenstown

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1874. 5,004 gross tons; 468 (bp) feet long; 45 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  1,720 passengers (220 first class, 1,500 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1874 and named Britannic. Liverpool - New York service. Fastest ship on the Atlantic in 1876. Scrapped in Germany in 1903.

 

The Citta Di Napoli

Maasland2.jpg

Contributed by Mr. Veenstra, USA. Many thanks

Departures: Napoli

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1871. 3,984 gross tons; 420 (bp) feet long; 40 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  1,166 passengers (166 first class, 1,000 third class).

Built for White Star and Dominion Lines, in 1871 and named Republic. Liverpool - New York service. Sold to Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1889 and renamed Maasdam. Rotterdam - New York service. Sold to La Veloce Line, in 1902 and renamed Citta Di Napoli. Italy - New York service. Used as accommodation ship for earthquake victims at Messina 1908-09. Scrapped in Italy in 1910.

The Family Drenthe sailed with this ship to the USA.

The trinidad

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Departures: Bermuda

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons Limited, Sunderland , England , 1884. 2,952 gross tons; 310 (bp) feet long; 37 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 9 knots.  

Built for Quebec Steamship Company, Canadian flag, in 1884 and named Trinidad. Transferred to Canadian Pacific Steamships, British flag, in 1913. Torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat off the English coast on March 22, 1918 .

 

The Grampian

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Departures: Liverpool

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(When you have any information on the last two and you want to share this with please send me an email: genea@coone.com )

 

Ships that the family Griek sailed with to Ellis Island

The Statendam

 

 

The Ryndam

The Ryndam

Departures: Rotterdam

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1901. 12,527 gross tons; 575 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,282 passengers (286 first class, 196 second class, 1,800 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1901 and named Rijndam. Rotterdam - New York service. Laid up in 1917 due to World War I. Chartered by United States Navy, American flag, in 1918. Used as a troopship. Rotterdam - New York service 1919-28. Scrapped in Holland in 1929.

 

The Rotterdam

The Rotterdam

Departures: Rotterdam

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1908. 24,149 gross tons; 667 (bp) feet long; 77 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 17 knots.  3,575 passengers (520 first class, 555 second class, 2,500 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1908 and named Rotterdam . Rotterdam - New York service. Laid up for most of World War I. Broken up in Holland in 1940.

The coama

The Coama

Departure: San Juan

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Glasgow , Scotland , 1891. 4,275 gross tons; 385 (bp) feet long; 46 feet wide. Compound engine, single screw.  Service speed 14 knots.  

Built for State Line, British flag, in 1891 and named State of California . Transferred to Allan State Line, British flag, in 1892. Glasgow - New York service. Renamed Californian in 1898. Stranded near Portland in 1900, but salvaged and repaired. Sold to New York & Porto Rico Steamship Company, American flag, in 1901 and renamed Coamo. New York-Caribbean service. Scrapped in 1925.

The Noordam

The Noordam

Departures:  Rotterdam

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1902. 12,531 gross tons; 575 (bp) feet long; 62 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  2,278 passengers (286 first class, 192 second class, 1,800 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1902 and named Noordam. Rotterdam - New York service. Chartered by Swedish American Line, in 1922 and renamed Kungsholm. Gothenburg- New York service. Returned to Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1924 and reverted to Noordam. Rotterdam - New York service. Laid up in 1927. Scrapped in Holland in 1928. in 1928.

 

The Michigan

The Michigan

Departures: London

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1891. 3,722 gross tons; 370 (bp) feet long; 44 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engine, single screw.  Service speed 13.5 knots.  

Built for Atlantic Transport Line, British flag, in 1891 and renamed Michigan . London - New York and London-Baltimore service. Transferred to National Line, British flag, in 1896. Sold to US Government, in 1898 and renamed USS Kipatrick. Sold to American Near East And Black Sea Line, American flag, in 1920. New York-Constantinople service service. Rebuilt. Sold to Booras Line, American flag, in 1923 and renamed Washington . New York-Mediterranean service. Sold to T. C. Phelps, American flag, in 1923 and renamed Great Canton. Scrapped in Italy in 1924.

The Nieuw Amsterdam

The Nieuw Amsterdam

Departures: Rotterdam

 

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1906. 16,967 gross tons; 615 (bp) feet long; 68 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 16 knots.  2,886 passengers (440 first class, 246 second class, 2,200 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1906 and named Nieuw Amsterdam. Rotterdam - New York service. Last major liner to be fitted with auxiliary sails. Broken up in Japan in 1932.

The Statendam

The Statendam

Departures: Rotterdam

 

Built by Harlan & Wolff Limited, Belfast , Northern Ireland , 1898. 10,491 gross tons; 534 (bp) feet long; 59 feet wide. Steam triple expansion engines, twin screw.  Service speed 15 knots.  1,375 passengers (200 first class, 175 second class, 1,000 third class).

Built for Holland - America Line, Dutch flag, in 1898 and named Statendam. Rotterdam - New York service. Sold to Allan State Line, British flag, in 1911 and renamed Scotian. Liverpool-Montreal service. Used as a troopship 1914-18. Transferred to Canadian Pacific Steamships, British flag, in 1915. Renamed Marglen in 1922. Laid up in 1925. Scrapped in Italy in 1927.

 
 
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